Monday May 11, 2015

Faint Hope for Suspended Drivers

Authored by: Terrance G. Sheppard Posted in: Criminal Law

If your license has been permanently suspended because of impaired driving charges, a new amendment, effective April 1, 2015, gives some hope that you may be able to get your license back. You have to have had your license suspended for 10 years, and must be willing to have the alcohol ignition interlock device attached to your car for at least 5 years. The interlock device required drivers to blow into it prior to the car starting, and at random intervals while the car is in motion. The car will only start, or continue to operate, if the driver has a zero blood alcohol content.

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal estimate that about 86 drivers are eligible under this “Faint Hope” clause.

For further information, connect with a member of our team. To contact a member of our Criminal Law team call us at 902-469-9500 or 1-866-339-3400. 

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