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Friday November 17, 2017

Do I Need an Interim Agreement or Order?

Authored by: Jessica D. Chapman Posted in: Family Law

In the days, weeks and months following a couple’s separation there are often many moving parts.  Frequently, emotions are high, and it is an uncertain time of transition for the parties, as well as any children of the relationship. Everyone is becoming accustomed to a ‘new normal’. Immediately following a separation there is most often no agreement or Order in place related to financial support or parenting. Many people are left wondering things like: Can I move out? Can I make the other party move out? Who is responsible for making our rent or mortgage payment? When is my time with the kids? Do I have to pay support? Am I entitled to support?

Sometimes it is in the best interests of the parties, as well as any children of the relationship, to ensure there is a temporary agreement or Interim Order in place; this can provide predictability for everyone, while the parties attempt to settle outstanding issues or await a Trial. Interim Agreements and Orders can help to minimize conflict and reduce unnecessary back and forth between the parties. While interim arrangements may be made by agreement, parties may also file an Interim Motion with the Court. Interim Motions may request that the Court provide interim relief related to custody, parenting, child support, spousal support, exclusive possession of the home and more.

For more information about obtaining an Interim Agreement or Order and whether it is best in your situation, please contact BOYNECLARKE LLP at 902-469-9500 to schedule your free 30-minute consultation with a member of our Family Law Team.

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