Tuesday November 17, 2015

Accessing Financial Aid After a Collision

Posted in: Personal Injury

Injuries caused by a motor vehicle collision often take a financial toll on the individuals involved. Whether or not you are at fault for the collision, and whether or not you are employed, you may have access to some financial resources to help you in the aftermath of a collision.

Steps to Engage the Benefit

You need to contact your own insurance company and advise them of the accident. It is important to note that speaking with your insurance broker is not the same as contacting the insurance company itself. The broker does not have authority to authorize financial benefits. If you usually deal with a broker, you will need to ask them for the direct contact information of your insurance company so you may start a claim.

You insurance company may send you forms to be filled out by yourself, your doctor and your employer (if applicable). You will need to fill these out in order to receive funds and it is important that you do this in a timely fashion.

Benefits if You Are Employed

If you are employed, and put off work for more than a week after an accident, you may qualify for a loss of income benefit. The income benefit is equal to 80% of your usual gross wages or $250 per week, whichever is less. These benefits can go on indefinitely, as long as you continue to meet the medical criteria.

It is also important to know that if you were not at fault for the accident, any net loss you experience over and above this income benefit should be paid by the insurance company of the person who caused the accident. The process for this, however, goes beyond the scope of this blog.

Benefits if You Are Not Employed

If you are unemployed, you may qualify for a weekly benefit called the ‘principal unpaid housekeeper’ benefit. This benefit is available to anyone who is not working for profit and does most of their housework. This includes individuals who attend school or volunteer some spare time outside of the home. 

The medical test for this benefit is that you must be unable to perform any of your household duties. Your doctor should let you know whether or not you meet the test required to obtain the benefits, after you bring her or him the insurance company’s form.

The amount of this benefit is $100 per week and they are payable for a maximum of one year.

Understanding Common Roadblocks

Entitlement to financial benefits can become more complex in certain situations. The most common examples are as follows:

In any of the above situations, it is likely worth your time to have a free consultation with a lawyer on our Personal Injury team. We can assist you in clearly understanding your rights and options so that you may move forward in this process and obtain proper compensation.

Connect with a member of our team today to schedule your free consultation. To contact a member of our Personal Injury team call us at 902-469-9500 or 1-866-339-3400.

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