Monday November 27, 2017

Child Tax Benefits After Separation

Authored by: Jessica D. Chapman Posted in: Family Law

The Canada Child Tax Benefit and Canada Child Benefit help eligible families with the cost of raising children. The primary caregiver of the children is entitled to collect these benefits. Following a separation or divorce however, determining who is the primary caregiver and who is entitled to these benefits can be a confusing and messy exercise. Chartered Accountant, Tim Cestnick, provides further insight into this issue in a recent article published in the Globe and Mail.

Click here to read the full article.

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