Thursday March 10, 2016

Are You Travelling With Children?

Authored by: Terrance G. Sheppard Posted in: Family Law

If you are travelling within Canada with your children, very little documentation is required, although you should be sure that you have current identification for yourself and each child. However, if you are travelling outside of Canada, unless both parents are travelling with the children, in addition to the children’s Passports, you should have a Travel Letter signed by the parent not travelling with the children.

You may very well be asked for this Travel Letter when entering a foreign country, or even upon returning to Canada. In addition, having the Travel Letter notarized by a lawyer helps authenticate it as legitimate. Canadian Border Services Agency actively looks for missing children, and may very well ask detailed questions about any children travelling with you.

In addition, if you are separated or divorced from the other parent, it is advisable to carry your custody documentation (Separation Agreement, Parenting Agreement, Custody Order, etc.) with you.

For an interactive template of a Travel Letter, visit http://travel.gc.ca/travelling/children/consent-letter, or contact one of our Family Law lawyers. BOYNECLARKE LLP will prepare the Travel Letter and notarize it for a flat fee of $75.00 plus HST. To contact a member of our Family Law team call us at 902-469-9500 or 1-866-339-3400.   

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